Blackboard Achieve is only available to clients with the Blackboard Achieve license.

Students include users enrolled with the student course role in Learn. Instructors are users in a course with a role different from student. Instructor includes instructors, facilitators, graders and teaching assistants.

The Learner Performance and Grades reports starts with these tabs: 

By default the report opens on the Course Grades tab.

Filters to refine the report follow the tabs. After these controls are the visuals that show the data for the consideration visible. 

Together, the data shows the level of student engagement and performance. Use this information to make decisions around training, policies, intervention, staffing, events, and so on.

Course Grades

Course grades serve as indicators of student performance.  

Current final grade is a measure of the normalized (%) grade score for a student in a course. For example, a student on a course with a total grade of 15 out of 20 points would have a normalized grade of 75% and would be counted in the 70-79% band. 

For completed courses, we use the grade reported in the ‘external’ grade column in Learn. For unfinished courses, we use the current grade and information about the remaining assessments to create a projected grade. Projected scores assume the same pace of performance on completed assessments. 

This measure only includes courses in which any grades have been posted; and only counts active students, which include users enrolled with the student course role in Learn. Active students accessed and registered activity in the course.

The distribution of course by current final grade chart counts the number of students that have a normalized grade score in each of the 10% bands shown. Each bar in the chart corresponds to a 10% band for the current final grade. The Y-axis represents how many students fall into each of the bands. 

Screenshot distribution of courses by current final grade bar graph

Point to a bar in the histogram for more details.

 

Use insights from course grades to identify academic units where policies are not being followed, based on the overall distribution of student enrollments within a particular grade band.  You may also use this chart to identify problems in the setup of the grade center, for instance where there are lots of grades at, or below, zero, or above 100%. 

 

Student Engagement and Course Grades

The student engagement and course grades data starts with student time in content vs. grades and ends with student social/collaborative interaction count vs. grades.

Student Time in Content vs. Grades 

Promoting student interactions with content can lead to higher engagement in online courses (Martin & Bolliger, 2018; Moore, 1989). Learner-to-content interaction (or engagement) is “the process of intellectually interacting with content that results in changes in the learner’s understanding, the learner’s perspective, or the cognitive structures of the learner’s mind” (Moore, 1989, p. 2).

Time in course content is a measure of the aggregated time, in minutes, that a student spends in content items in a course. Content is any instructional or study resource content item, including documents, files, learning modules, SCORM packages, syllabi, and so on.  

Current final grade is a measure of the normalized (%) grade score for a student in a course. For completed courses, we use the grade reported in the ‘external’ grade column in Learn. For unfinished courses, we use the current grade and information about the remaining assessments to create a projected grade. Projected scores assume the same pace of performance on completed assessments. 

These measures only include active students, which are users enrolled with the student course role in Learn. Active students accessed and registered activity in the course.

The student time in course content vs. grades chart compares a student’s time in content and current final grade, across all courses within the filters you’ve selected. Each dot in the chart represents an active student in a course. Look for a trend in the data as you go from left to right. For example, if data points make a straight line, it suggests that there is a positive relationship between time in course content and current final grade. 

 

Screenshot student time in course content vs. grades scatter plot graph

Point to a dot on the scatter plot to see the details.

Use insights from Student time in course content vs. grades to analyze how a student’s time in content relates (or not) to the current final grade in a course. Consider the available content items as you review this data.  

Consider the available content items as you review this data. If there are a lot of points with little student time in content, course content item usage in courses may be low. 

Student Social/Collaborative Interaction count vs. Grades 

Interactions with peers, instructors, and content can lead to higher engagement in courses (Martin & Bolliger, 2018; Moore, 1989). “To prevent online students from experiencing potential boredom and isolation in the learning environment, it is essential to build activities that enhance engagement. These activities assist students in feeling connected and can create a dynamic sense of community” (Martin & Bolliger, 2018, p. 208).

Social/collaborative learning interaction count is a measure of the number of clicks and page loads a student has in social and collaborative learning activities in a course. These learning activities include discussions, blogs, journals, and wikis. 

Current final grade is a measure of the normalized (%) grade score for a student in a course. For completed courses, we use the grade reported in the ‘external’ grade column in Learn. For unfinished courses, we use the current grade and information about the remaining assessments to create a projected grade. Projected scores assume the same pace of performance on completed assessments. 

These measures only include active students, which are users enrolled with the student course role in Learn. Active students accessed and registered activity in the course.

The student social/collaborative interaction count vs. grade chart compares a student’s social/collaborative interaction count and current final grade, across all courses within the filters you’ve selected. Each dot in the chart represents an active student in a course. Look for a trend in the data as you go from left to right. For example, if data points make a straight line, it suggests that there is a positive relationship between social/collaborative interaction count and current final grade. 

Screenshot student social/collaboration interaction count vs. grades scatter plot graph

Point to a dot on the scatter plot to see the details. 

Use insights from student social/collaborative interaction count vs. grades to analyze how a student’s level of engagement in social and collaborative learning activities relates (or not) to the current final grade in a course. 

Consider the available social and collaborative learning activities as you review this data. If there are a lot of points showing no social and collaborative interactions, social and collaborative learning activities may not be used in courses.

Instructor Practices and Student Engagement

For students, interactions with peers and instructors can lead to higher engagement in courses (Martin & Bolliger, 2018; Moore, 1989).  Instructional presence is an important consideration in student success. Engagement in social and collaborative learning activities—including discussions, blogs, journals, and wikis, makes online instructors real to students (Richardson et al., 2015, p. 259). 

Social/collaborative learning interaction count is a measure of the number of clicks and page loads a student or instructor has in social and collaborative learning activities in a course. These learning activities include discussions, blogs, journals, and wikis.

These measures are calculated for active students and instructors. Active students are users enrolled with the student course role in Learn, that accessed and registered activity in a course. Instructors are users in a course with the instructor, teaching assistant, grader, or facilitator course role in Learn, that accessed and registered activity in a course. 

This measure considers data for all instructors enrolled in that course. If a course has multiple instructors, this measure will consider data for all instructors enrolled in that course. 

The instructor presence vs. student engagement in social/collaborative learning chart compares instructors and students’ social/collaborative learning interaction counts, across all courses within the filters you have selected. Each dot in the chart represents a course. Look for a trend in the data as you go from left to right. For example, if data points make a straight line, it suggests that there is a positive relationship between instructor presence and student engagement in social and collaborative learning activities. 

Screenshot instructor presence vs. student engagement in social/collaborative learning scatter plot graph

Point to a dot to see more details. 

Use insights from instructor practices and student engagement to analyze how the level of instructor presence and student engagement in social and collaborative learning activities are related (or not).  

Consider the available social and collaborative learning activities as you review this data. If there are a lot of points showing no social and collaborative interaction counts, social and collaborative learning activities may not be used in courses.

 

You can use the language selector to choose your preferred language. There are terms that aren't currently localized and will remain in English after you’ve selected another language. The localized version of these terms will be delivered in a progressive manner throughout 2021 and 2022.