Blackboard Achieve is only available to clients with the Blackboard Achieve license.

Students include users enrolled with the student course role in Learn. Instructors are users in a course with a role different from student. Instructor includes instructors, facilitators, graders and teaching assistants.

Regular and consistent participation shows how well students self-regulate and manage their time. Self-regulation and time management is an important consideration in forecasting future learning performance (Hung & Zang, 2008Jo et al., 2015Wong, 2018). Jo et al. (2015) argued that “learners who sustain consistent endeavors are more likely to study on a regular basis” (p. 216).

The Student Engagement report starts with tabs for each of these considerations: 

By default the report opens on the Course Access tab.

 

Filters to refine the report follow the tabs. After these controls are the visuals that show the data for the consideration visible. 

Together, the data shows how active and engaged students are in their online courses. Use this information to make decisions around training, policies, intervention, staffing, events, and so on. 

Course Access

Research supports that regular and consistent course activity shows how well students self-regulate and manage their time. Self-regulation and time management is an important consideration in forecasting future learning performance (Hung & Zang, 2008; Jo et al., 2015; Wong, 2018).  Jo et al. (2015) argued that “students who sustain consistent endeavors are more likely to study on a regular basis” (p. 216). One sign of student time management is how often students access their courses. 

The Course access data starts with student count based on course activity and ends with the frequency of student access. 

Student Count Based on Course Activity 

Active students is a measure of the number of students enrolled and with activity throughout the duration of a course. Students who dropped or withdrew from the course after at least one day of activity are included. 

Inactive students is a measure of the number of students enrolled and with no activity throughout the duration of a course. Inactive students may include students who dropped or withdrew from the course. 

The student count based on course activity chart shows a count of active students and inactive students, across all courses within the filters you’ve selected. The chart counts course enrollments, and not unique students. For example, if a student is enrolled in many courses, each enrollment is counted. 

Inactive learners may include learners who dropped or withdrew from the course.

Select the information in the chart to see it clearer.

Screenshot of student student count based on course activity chart

Frequency of Student Access

The frequency of student access is a measure of the percentage of available days a student visits a course. This measure only counts active students, which include users enrolled with the student course role in Learn. Active students accessed and registered activity in the course. If the course has ended, the percentage is based on the total days of the course from start to end. If the course is ongoing, the percentage is based on the number of days the course has been available so far.

The Minimum, Maximum, and Average frequency of student access numbers are based on the percentage of available days a student visits a course. This measure only counts active students, which include users enrolled with the student course role in Learn. Active students accessed and registered activity in the course. If the course has ended, the percentage is based on the total days of the course from start to end. If the course is ongoing, the percentage is based on the number of days the course has been available so far. 

The student distribution by frequency of course access histogram measures the percentage of available days a student visits a course, across all courses within the filters you’ve selected. Each bar in the chart corresponds to a 10% band for the frequency of student access. The Y-axis represents how many courses fall into each of the bands. 

Point to a bar in the histogram for more details.

Screenshot frequency of student access bar graph

 

Use insights from frequency of student access to identify academic units and courses where student frequency of access is below expectation, and that could be impacting learning outcomes. These insights can inform instructor training/coaching and/or other interventions with students to increase students’ engagement in the course.

Engagement with Course Content

Promoting student interactions with content can lead to higher engagement in online courses (Martin & Bolliger, 2018Moore, 1989). Student-to-content interaction (or engagement) is “the process of intellectually interacting with content that results in changes in the learner’s understanding, the learner’s perspective, or the cognitive structures of the learner’s mind” (Moore, 1989, p. 2). 

One consideration for the level of student interaction with online content is the time spent with the material.  

The Minimum, Maximum, and Average student time in course content numbers are based on the aggregated time, in minutes, that a student spends in content items in a course. Content is any instructional or study resource content item, including documents, files, learning modules, SCORM packages, syllabi, and so on. This measure only counts active students, which includes users enrolled with the student course role in Learn. Active students accessed and registered activity in the course. 

Use the drop-down control to select the measure to display in visuals, based on your selected parameter value — total minutes or weekly average minutes. Total minutes is the default value.  

Screenshot measure to display total minutes or weekly average minutes drop down menu

 

The student distribution by time in course content histogram measures the time a student spends in content items. Each bar in the chart corresponds to a range of values for student time in content. The Y-axis represents how many students fall into each of those ranges. 

Point to a bar in the histogram for more details.

Screenshot student time in course content bar graph

 

The student time in content by course item type table shows the minimum, maximum and average student time in course content, by content item type, across all courses within the filters you’ve selected. 

Screenshot student time in content by course item type table

Select the column headings to sort the table.

Use insights from engagement with course content to identify academic units and courses where student frequency of access is below expectation, and that could be impacting learning outcomes. These insights can inform instructor training/coaching and/or other interventions with students to increase students’ engagement in the course. 

Engagement with Peers and Instructors

The engagement with peers and instructors data starts with student engagement in social/collaborative learning activities and ends with student participation in synchronous Collaborate sessions. 

Engagement in Social and Collaborative Learning Activities 

Interactions with peers, instructors, and content can lead to higher engagement in courses (Martin & Bolliger, 2018Moore, 1989). “To prevent online students from experiencing potential boredom and isolation in the learning environment, it is essential to build activities that enhance engagement. These activities assist students in feeling connected and can create a dynamic sense of community” (Martin & Bolliger, 2018, p. 208).

Student social/collaborative learning interaction count is a measure of the number of clicks and page loads a student has in social and collaborative learning activities in a course. Social and collaborative learning activities provide opportunities for students to interact with peers and instructors. 

Social and collaborative learning activities include: 

  1. Discussions
  2. Blogs
  3. Journals
  4. Wikis

This measure only counts active students, which includes users enrolled with the student course role in Learn. Active students accessed and registered activity in the course.  

Use the drop-down control to select the measure to display in visuals, based on your selected parameter value — total interaction count or weekly average interaction count. Total interaction count is the default value. 

Screenshot measure to display drop down menu

 

The student distribution by student social/collaborative learning interaction count histogram measures the number of clicks and page loads in social and collaborative learning activities, across all courses within the filters you’ve selected. Each bar in the chart corresponds to a range of values for student social/collaborative learning interaction count. The Y-axis represents how many students fall into each of those ranges. 

Point to a bar in the histogram for more details.

Screenshot student distribution by student social/collaborative learning interaction count bar graph

 

The student social/collaborative learning interaction count by tool type table shows the minimum, maximum and average student interaction count by tool type, across all courses within the filters you've selected. 

Screenshot student social/collaborative learning interaction count by tool type table

Select the column headings to sort the table.

The learner participation in Collaborate sessions metrics show the percentage of time a learner attended course Collaborate sessions. The metric is based on the total minutes sessions ran. Only sessions instructors joined for some of the time are included.

Use insights from engagement in social and collaborative learning activities to identify academic units and courses where students’ level of engagement in social and collaborative learning activities is below expectation, and that could be impacting learning outcomes. These insights can inform instructor training/coaching and/or other interventions with students to increase engagement in course activities. 

 

Student Participation in Synchronous Collaborate Sessions 

Research supports those regular interactions with peers and instructors can lead to higher student course engagement (Basko & Hartman, 2017; Chen et al., 2019; Martin & Bolliger, 2018). Synchronous sessions using Collaborate provide opportunities for real-time interaction. Instructors and students can share knowledge, collaborate, build relationships, and create online community. 

The minimum, maximum, and average rate of student participation in Collaborate sessions numbers are based on percentage of time a student attends synchronous sessions using Collaborate in a course.

The measure is based on an aggregate per course, of the duration in minutes, for Collaborate sessions in which both students and instructors were present. This measure only counts active students, which include users enrolled with the student course role in Learn. Active students accessed and registered activity in the course. 

The student distribution by rate of student participation in Collaborate sessions histogram measures the percentage of time a student attends synchronous sessions using Collaborate in a course, across all courses within the filters you’ve selected. Each bar in the chart corresponds to a 10% band for the rate of student participation in Collaborate sessions. The Y-axis represents how many students fall into each of the bands. 

Use insights from student participation in synchronous Collaborate sessions to identify academic units and courses where the rate of student participation in synchronous sessions using Collaborate is below expectation, and that could be impacting learning outcomes. These insights can inform instructor training/coaching and/or other interventions with students to increase students’ participation in course activities. Consider that if you don't use Collaborate, no data is shown in this chart. 

Point to a bar in the histogram for more details.  

Screenshot student participation in collaborate sessions data

If you don't use Blackboard Collaborate, no data is shown.
 

Engagement with Assessments

How quickly students submit course assessments is an important consideration for success (Yalcin et al., 2015). “A late student submission or slow feedback in returning grades can cause cascading problems for subsequent student work and lower student success” (p. 11). 

Timeliness of assessment submission shows students timeliness in completing course assessments. Course assessments include assignments, blogs, discussions, journals, tests, wikis, and so on. Only course assessments with due dates are included.

Timeliness of assessment submission is grouped into four categories: 

  • On-time: Assessments completed on or before the due date.
  • Late: Assessments completed after the due date.
  • Overdue: Assessments haven’t been completed. Due date has passed. 
  • Upcoming: Assessments haven’t been completed. Due date is in the future. 

These measures only count assessments expected for and completed by active students. Students include users enrolled with the student course role in Learn. Active students accessed and registered activity in the course.

The assessment distribution by completion status table describes how timely students complete course assessments, across all courses within the filters you’ve selected.

Select the column headings to sort the table.

Screenshot assessment distribution by completion status data

 

Use insights from engagement with assessment to identify academic units and courses where the timeliness of assessment completion is an issue, and that could be impacting learning outcomes. These insights can inform instructor training/coaching and/or other interventions to improve students’ timeliness in completing course assessments.  

 

 

You can use the language selector to choose your preferred language. There are terms that aren't currently localized and will remain in English after you’ve selected another language. The localized version of these terms will be delivered in a progressive manner throughout 2021 and 2022.